78 St. Francis Street Mobile, AL      (251) 367-4599

Loading Events
  • This event has passed.

Soul Sisters Tour: Shannon Labrie, Lisa Mills, Kyshona Armstrong

May 20 @ 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm CDT

$20

Tickets: $20 (Call  251-367-4599 to reserve)

The Listening Room of Mobile is proud to present The Soul Sisters Tour, featuring the talents of Shannon Labrie, Lisa Mills, and Kyshona Armstrong.


Music by Nashville chanteuse Shannon LaBrie defies genre and brings to life insightful stories of a woman who remains true to herself in a life where uncertainty is certain. The Lincoln, NE native instantly became a favorite among music fans and critics alike with her powerful 2013 debut Just Be Honest. With her lead single, “I Remember a Boy,” the independent release reached inside the Top Ten on iTunes and the Triple A Radio charts. Famed music blogger Bob Lefsetz wrote, “This track affected me. Made me believe like the great singer-songwriters of yore, maybe this woman has something to say. That in this crazy, mixed up, shoot-up world she can illuminate her story and people can relate.”

In April 2016, LaBrie returns with her introspective sophomore album, War & Peace. Tracked live at Nashville’s House of Blues Studio D with producer Tom Michael, War & Peace is an emotionally-charged collection of deep Americana soul that gives voice to the love and loss Labrie experienced throughout her life. “When I listen to music,” Labrie says, “a lot of times, it’s to make me feel good. But a lot of other times, it’s to make me not feel alone. I started writing this album after a loss that put me at war with everything in my life. These songs are small doses of the war I feel inside and the peace I long to find.”

Austin Chronicle calls LaBrie, “a true guitarist singer/songwriter whose soulful voice’s sensual honey-crisp highs brings to mind the late, great Jeff Buckley.” Rolling Stone says “It’s as if Norah Jones and the great late Jeff Buckley started a band and went a tiny bit country.”

She has opened for Gabe Dixon, Phoenix, ZZ Ward, The Head and the Heart, The Wild Feathers, Michael Franti and Valerie June. Her résumé includes Triple A Radio Conference, Lightning 100 Sunday Night Showcase, World Cafe, Hotel Cafe, South By Southwest, the Austin City Limits Festival, Road to the Hangout and Road to Bonnaroo.
To learn more about Shannon Labrie, visit: http://www.shannonlabriemusic.com


Lisa Mills is a Mississippi native who resides in Mobile, Alabama. The Gulf Coast is a region where Southern musical influences that easily can be taken for granted come together in ways that can’t. Yes, Mills often sings the blues – but to call her a blues singer would be to miss the point entirely. Her blues influences aren’t always the ones would expect, including a healthy measure of country blues, a sadly neglected genre. She can sing straight-up gospel, as she does in daringly a cappella fashion on “Tell Me.” She has toured with Big Brother & The Holding Company, singing the songs of one of rock’s most revered female vocalists, and her understanding of Janis Joplin’s gifts is far more insightful than the superficial norm. Just listen to the fragile balance of vulnerability and indomitability she brings to “Better Than This.”

The project was a major undertaking that brought back together almost all the musicians involved in the original 2005 recording sessions and added John Milham on drums. The returning players included U.K. bassist Ian Jennings; the plane ticket was worth it just for the blend of his upright bass and Corky Hughes’ resonator slide work on “Wish I Was in Heaven.”

You can call Lisa Mills a blues singer, or a gospel singer, or a torch singer or an R&B singer and not be wrong. But with Mills, none of those labels are true in the way you expect. Listen to “I Don’t Want To Be Happy,” when she sings: “Act a fool/ it’s all I ever do/ take each lie you make and believe it to be true/ and I kneel at the altar in the church of the painful truth/ I don’t want to be happy/ I just want to be with you.” Listen to the way the deceptively simple arrangement surrounds the raw vocal like the setting of a jewel; hear the way Shoemaker lets it breathe. Listen to the way Mills’ vocal on the title track conveys tenderness and power at the same time. Listen to the rhythm of “Shake It” the soft beats like stalking footfalls. Listen to her deep-blues take on “Little Wing.” You’ve heard the song before, but you’ve never felt it send shivers up and down your spine like this.

Lisa Mills is changing. She’s changing the way we hear things. And nothing is going to stay the same.

-Lawrence Specker, Mobile Press Register

For more information on Lisa Mills, visit: http://www.lisamills.com


Kyshona Armstrong started out enabling others to enjoy the healing properties of songwriting, and keeping her thoughts to herself. When you’re a music therapist to incarcerated and institutionalized adults and school children with emotional behavior disorders, artistic considerations aren’t even on the table.

“I definitely had to accept the fact that when I’m writing with a patient, whatever they want to do is what they want to do,” Armstrong tells the Scene as she nurses a latte in East Nashville. “It’s their song: ‘Even if it might not fit in a form, if that’s what you want to say, say it. We’re not writing a big hit. This is for you.’ ”

When Armstrong worked first in the state mental hospital, then the public school system in Georgia, she found that her co-writers often clung to chant-like, circular song ideas. “They would find this melody they liked and they would stick to it,” she explains. “It was theirs to keep. It wasn’t hard to hold onto.”

When describing the positions she held during her decade or so in the mental health field, she punctuates each chapter with the same phrase: “That got kinda heavy.” The weight of it was what eventually moved her to begin penning her own tunes.

“A lot of my first songs were dealing with what I saw my patients struggling with,” she recalls. “A lot of my songs were about the stories that I would hear from them. Because I can only take on so much of people dumping. So I had to get rid of it and shed it somehow. I think telling their stories was one way for me to go out in the world and be like, ‘There’s so much more happening out there.’ For me, that was therapeutic. I don’t like to talk about myself, but I’ll talk about everybody else if you want me to share a story.”

At a certain point, her emotional investment in her patients’ pain became too much to purge at coffeehouse open mics. “You’ve gotta know when to tap out,” she says. “I was like, ‘I’m not of any use to these kids if I can’t give myself as fully as I used to.’ ”

So Armstrong got on the college singer-songwriter circuit, blending skills of empathizing and entertaining. Her set lists might put a strummy version of Britney Spears’ “Toxic” next to “Confined,” a song she’d written with a couple of 20-somethings in the mental hospital. They were the hip-hop heads in the patients’ band — otherwise made up of Elvis-obsessed middle-aged men — and they’d wanted a song in the group repertoire that spoke to their own experience.

Besides teaching institutionalized adults and emotionally troubled school kids how to have healthy interactions with instruments in hand, Armstrong served a similar mission on the board of the Southern Girls Rock Camp in Athens, Ga. And that made her a shoo-in to volunteer at last summer’s Tennessee Teens Rock Camp, where she met a bunch of the women with whom she’ll perform at the girl group tribute She’s a Rebel a few days after playing her own show at 12th & Porter.

Armstrong moved to Nashville in January 2014, spending the first couple months commuting back to Athens to record her album Go, but easily made friends and landed bookings in local folk singer-songwriter, pop and soul scenes once she was around more. Smack-dab in the middle ofGo is a song that distills the insights of her therapeutic work and the artistic aspirations she’s developed since. Called “Cornelius Dupree,” it’s the turbulent channeling of a black man’s real-life experience serving 30 years in Texas for rape and robbery before being exonerated. Rather than narrate the external details of Dupree’s story, Armstrong gives voice to the searing physical and emotional strain he must’ve felt having to defend his innocence for so long.

“That one took me a long time,” she says of the song, “because I wanted to do it right. I tried it from the outside looking in. But in the end I was like, ‘I have to put myself in those shoes.’ ”

She adds, “The injustice that Cornelius suffered, on a much smaller level I have experienced that myself, just being a black woman living in the South. I’ve been held by the police before for nothing, and it’s frustrating. I’ve never been imprisoned, but I’ve been held aside. I remember the injustice I felt and the anger I felt. But I’ve always been taught I have to be extra kind, extra polite to compensate. …With his story, I think I just got fed up.”

At college shows, Armstrong urges students to look up Dupree’s story on their phones — and hopefully expand their awareness of human suffering — even as she’s singing her song. “Cornelius Dupree” had a similarly awakening effect when she performed it at a house concert 20 minutes outside of Ferguson, Mo. She’d driven up strictly to join the protests after Michael Brown’s shooting, but accepted a friend’s invitation to a combination concert and cookout in the suburbs one evening. Folks there seemed downright oblivious to the neighboring turmoil. At the end of the night, the host thanked her for getting their attention.

Armstrong has reached the point where she embraces repetitive internal rhythms that emerge in some of her songwriting — likening them to both gospel spirituals and the viscerally simplistic utterances of her former patients — and she’s delivering her roots-soul originals with articulate warmth and newly claimed authority.

“I feel like I’m only just now stepping into this activist role,” she says, “or not activist, but someone who speaks out or brings up a subject that’s uncomfortable. In the past, I haven’t been the one to [say], ‘I’m gonna throw some mess on the table, and we’re gonna talk about it.’ But I want to be.”

To learn more about Kyshona Armstrong, visit: http://www.kyshona.com

Details

Date:
May 20
Time:
7:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Cost:
$20
Event Category:

Organizer

Jim Pennington
Phone:
(251) 367-4599
Email:
jpenn7777@gmail.com
Website:
http://thelisteningroommobile.com

Venue

The Listening Room of Mobile

© 2017, The Listening Room of Mobile

Site configuration and maintenance by J. Brooke Chao Designs, LLC
This site uses the Garnish Theme by Boxy Studio.